ARE HIGH SPEED TRAINS ON THE RIGHT TRACK?

After decades of losing passengers to cars and aircraft without a whimper, railways are fighting back with new high speed trains. Merging aerospace technology with railway traditions has its difficulties, but some of the new trains are running already. When the Japanese opened the 515 km New Tokaido Shinkansen line in 1964, and then went on to run it at a profit, railway administrations throughout the world sat up and took notice. Japanese National Railways had not only made 200 km/h running an everyday event, but also shown clearly that high speeds and shorter journey times, far from being impossibly expensive, held one of the keys to commercial success. Only now, when the Paris-based International Union of Railways has announced a "Master Plan" for Europe's railways involving construction of 6000 km of high speed lines, and Italian Railways is busy building the first of them between Rome and Florence, can one see the Japanese pattern of purpose-built high-speed railways emerging in other countries.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    New Science Publications

    128 Long Acre
    London,   England  WC2 9QH
  • Authors:
    • YEARSLEY, I
  • Publication Date: 1973-9-6

Media Info

  • Features: Figures;
  • Pagination: Assistant
  • Serial:
    • NEW SCIENTIST
    • Volume: 59
    • Issue Number: 862
    • Publisher: REED BUSINESS INFORMATION LTD
    • ISSN: 0262-4079

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00047976
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 13 1974 12:00AM