ENERGY CONSUMPTION OF THE JOURNEY TO WORK WITH AND WITHOUT A SUBURBAN RAPID TRANSIT LINE

In an effort to provide an improved framework for evaluating alternative transportation systems with respect to energy conservation, the Philadelphia-Lindenwold rail rapid transit line was studied. The energy consumed by journey-to-work trips on the Lindenwold Line in 1970--including not only the energy required to operate the line but also the energy required for access and egress--was estimated (along with the cost of the fuel consumed by these trips). The energy that would have been consumed by these trips if the former modes of travel were used was also estimated. Comparison of these two amounts of energy consumption provides a basis for evaluating the energy conservation potential of the Lindewold Line. It is found that (a) the slightly indirect nature of the park-and-ride mode results in longer travel distances than did the automobile and bus modes it replaced and (b) the lower energy intensiveness of park-and-ride relative to the automobile does not offset these longer travel distances because many users of the line are former bus riders. Thus, the park-and-ride system consumes slightly more energy than did the former travel modes. It is concluded that the added travel distance of park-and-ride systems and the extent to which users of such systems are attracted from buses rather than from automobiles should be considered in evaluating rapid transit park-and-ride systems with respect to energy conservation. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; Maps; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 38-44
  • Monograph Title: Energy efficiency of various transportation modes
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00197126
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309028345
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 15 1982 12:00AM