EVALUATION BY EXPERIENCED RIDERS OF A NEW BICYCLE LANE IN AN ESTABLISHED BIKEWAY SYSTEM

The attitudes of cyclists toward a newly established on-street bicycle lane and its effect on their route selection was analyzed by pre- and post-bicycle lane mapping and interview studies and by pre- and post-bicycle lane traffic counts. Cyclists rated the street as a much improved bicycle route, and both the mapping interview studies and the traffic counts demonstrated that many of them shifted their route selection to take advantage of the bicycle lanes. These ratings and route selection shifts occurred because cyclists believed that the bicycle lanes made riding safer and more convenient by giving bicycles their own area on the street. The degree to which bicycle lanes were considered an improvement and the likelihood of a route shift to take advantage of them were strongly related to the age of the cyclist. Cyclists 25 and older perceived the greatest degree of improvement and were most strongly influenced in their route selection. College-age (18 to 24) cyclists perceived the smallest degree of improvement and were least influenced in their route selection by the installation of the lanes. /Authors/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; Maps; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 40-46
  • Monograph Title: Road user information needs, pedestrian movement and bicycle travel patterns
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00196664
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309028280
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-026 725
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Sep 15 1979 12:00AM