Strategies for Design and Construction of High-Reflectance Asphalt Pavements

The occurrence of higher air and surface temperatures in urban areas is known as the urban heat island (UHI) effect. Reducing the UHI effect in urban areas may decrease summer time energy use and improve human and ecological health. The Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED®) certification system, for some programs, awards up to three points for construction projects that provide any combination of the following cool pavement strategies for up to 75 percent of the site landscape: (1) shading hard surfaces on the site with landscape features; (2) using high-reflectance materials with a minimum Solar Reflectance Index (SRI) of 29; and (3) utilizing an open grid pavement system. While a guide to the design and construction of porous asphalt pavements has been around for some time, such a guide is not readily available for high-reflective asphalt pavements. The objective of this project is to identify and validate high-reflectance asphalt materials and pavement surface treatments that (1) are suitable for use in parking lots and other large paved surfaces; (2) have a minimum SRI of 29; and (3) are economically viable. In this study, six technologies exhibited SRI values of 29 or greater. They include E-Krete® micro-surfacing, StreetBondTM coating, synthetic binder, Densiphalt®, and chip and sand seals using light-colored aggregates. Another technology, surface gritting using light-colored aggregate, most likely would have exhibited SRI values of at least 29 if the aggregate had adhered properly to the asphalt mat. Except for surface gritting, as well as chip and sand seals, all other technologies appeared durable for parking lot applications after a durability test.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Web
  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 28p

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01144512
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NCAT Report 09-02
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 13 2009 4:13PM