ON THERMAL BUCKLING OF STRAIGHT RAILROAD TRACKS AND THE EFFECT OF TRACK LENGTH ON THE TRACK RESPONSE

A comparison of track buckling tests conducted by various railroads, with some recent analyses suggests that a number of the used buckling test facilities may have been too short, and hence the test results obtained may not represent the actual conditions in the field. Using the analysis for thermal track buckling recently derived by the author, the response of a long track is discussed first. It is shown that the drop of the axial force due to buckling is substantial. It is also shown that, contrary to a claim made by many authors, even a perfectly straight track may buckle beyond a certain temperature increase. The effect of lateral geometrical imperfection is pointed out. The short heated track is then analyzed, in order to determine the effect of test track length on the safe temperature increase and on the track displacements. It was found that track length does affect these quantities - namely, the shorter the test track the larger the effect - and thus that track length below a specific value will noticeably affect the test results. Paper concludes with a discussion of the consequences of these findings.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Princeton University

    Department of Civil Engineering
    Princeton, NJ  United States  08450

    National Science Foundation

    Division of Engineering, 1800 G Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20550
  • Authors:
    • Kerr, A D
  • Publication Date: 1976-11

Media Info

  • Pagination: 34 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00198588
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: 76-TR-19 Res Rpt.
  • Contract Numbers: NSF-ENG74-19030
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 17 1979 12:00AM