FIELD STUDY OF THE EFFECTS OF DRIVERS' ADAPTATION TO AUTOMOBILE VELOCITY

A roadside survey of vehicle velocities was carried out by radar on a four lane, median divided highway with a 50 mile-per-hour (80 km/h) legal speed limit. Northbound traffic on the highway had been previously exposed to expressway conditions with vehicle speeds in excess of 96 km/h, whereas southbound traffic had been previously exposed to an urban highway with speeds of about 64 km/h. Northbound traffic velocities exceeded those of southbound traffic by an average of 6.9 km/h, which, it is argued, is the result of drivers of northbound vehicles being exposed to conditions under which velocity adaptation occurs. An analysis of the data by vehicle category indicates that while large cars are driven significantly faster than small cars under all conditions, the magnitude of the velocity adaptation effect is greater for drivers of small cars.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Human Factors Society

    Johns Hopkins University Press
    Baltimore, MD  United States  21218
  • Authors:
    • Matthews, M L
  • Publication Date: 1978-12

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 709-716
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00195295
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Engineering Index
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 15 1979 12:00AM