ACCIDENT PROBABILITIES AND SEAT BELT USAGE: A PSYCHOLOGICAL PERSPECTIVE

Motorists' reluctance to wear seat belts is examined in the light of research showing (a) that protective behavior is influenced more by the probability of a hazard than by the magnitude of its consequences and (b) that people are not inclined to protect themselves voluntarily against very low probability threats. It is argued that the probability of death or injury on any single auto trip may be too low to incite a motorist's concern. Maintenance of a "single trip" perspective makes it unlikely that seat belts will be used. Change of perspective, towards consideration of the risks faced during a lifetime of driving, may increase the perceived probabilities of injury and death and, therefore, induce more people to wear seat belts.

  • Availability:
  • Authors:
    • SLOVIC, P
    • Fischhoff, B
    • Lichtenstein, S
  • Publication Date: 1978

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00194973
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-025 289
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 11 1979 12:00AM