DETACHMENT OF ICE FROM SURFACES BY APPLICATION OF HIGH INTENSITY LIGHT

A novel approach to the problem of detaching ice layers from surfaces is described. The primary problem is one of disrupting the bond of the frozen coating to the surface, at which point removal of the layer is a relatively simple matter. Some of the early methods that were examined at B. C. Research are described to show the progression which led finally to the subject technique. The use of high intensity light as the source of energy parallels the effect seen on a sunny winter's day, whereby, an ice coating exposed to the sun's rays experiences melting at the interface with the pavement surface. The advent of improved gas plasma arc lamps has provided the light intensity necessary to make this approach feasible for de-icing applications. A vehicle-mounted prototype de-icing unit that was field tested during the winter of 1977/78 is described and a brief discussion of the results and future prospects is presented. /Authors/

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 289-292
  • Monograph Title: SNOW REMOVAL AND ICE CONTROL RESEARCH
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00193893
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Jun 13 1979 12:00AM