THE EFFECT OF CHLORIDE CONCENTRATION ON AUTOMOBILE STOPPING DISTANCE

The objective of this study was to determine the relationship between chloride concentrations and stopping distances for various driving speeds on snow-covered asphalt pavement. Fields tests were conducted from January to March, 1978 at the Rochester Institute of Technology campus in Rochester, N.Y. Artificial trafficking was done by one driver with a single automobile, so that the factors in stopping distance measurement were minimized. Snow samples were collected at various points across the road profile after artificial trafficking. Approximately 250ml of snow was collected for each sample. The mercuric nitrate method was used in the determination of chloride concentration. The data were used to fit a mathematical model which relates the stopping distance and chloride concentration. Two of the most important observations of the study were: for an asphalt pavement covered with 5 cm (2 in.) or less of packed snow and for driving speeds of 48 km/hr (30 mi/hr) or less, there is no significant reduction of stopping distance when the chloride concentration in greater than 1,000 mg/l; also, the mathematical model developed may be used to determine the required chloride concentration based on the desired stopping distance at a given driving speed. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 270-274
  • Monograph Title: SNOW REMOVAL AND ICE CONTROL RESEARCH
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00193890
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, RITA, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Jun 13 1979 12:00AM