DEICING CHEMICAL RATES ON OPEN-GRADED PAVEMENTS

During the 1976-1977 winter season, the Federal Highway Administration sponsored studies in Maine, Michigan, Utah, and Vermont which were designed to determine if more sodium chloride is needed to clear open-graded asphalt friction courses during winter storms than is needed to clear conventional asphalt pavements. All of the states except Vermont were to observe the snow and ice-clearing rates of two open-graded control sections--one control section to be paired with one open graded section. Vermont was to observe the clearing rates of one open-graded pavement section and a single control section. For each observed storm, the condition of each pavement section was to be recorded at regular intervals during the snow clearing operation. Between five and twelve storms were observed by each state. With the exception of Vermont, the salt quantities applied to the open-graded and control sections during each storm were the same. Vermont used less salt on its open-graded section. The data shows that the clearing rates and appearance of open-graded and dense-graded pavements are not identical. While dense-graded pavement will occasionally clear faster than an open-graded pavements, the opposite is also true. Regardless of the clearing rates, an open graded pavement seems to provide a superior skid-resistanct surface during most storms. More salt is not needed to maintain this superior surface.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Pagination: pp 259-260
  • Monograph Title: SNOW REMOVAL AND ICE CONTROL RESEARCH
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00193888
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Jun 13 1979 12:00AM