OVERVIEW OF SOME OF THE FACTORS INFLUENCING SNOW AND ICE CONTROL AND THE RESULTANT IMPACTS OF THEIR IMPLEMENTATION

The costs of winter maintenance represent a substantial portion of the maintenance budgets of the snow belt states. These snow control expenditures are justified principally on the basis of accident reduction and maintaining traffic flow, the latter being justified as the basis for alleviating economic and social impacts to the community. However, the actual substance of these impacts and the methodology to measure them, in many instances, has been inadequate. This paper outlines methodologies for measuring delay, speed reduction, volume changes, and accident rates as a function of weather modified pavement surface condition. It cites the results of modified accident rate evaluations in three states. A principal finding is that accident injury rates increase as pavement conditions deteriorate, which is contrary to current views. Both public opinion polls and business polls were conducted. The business polls indicate that many costs attributed to storms have probably been over stated. The public opinion poll was conducted in four states. It has an error of estimate of plus or minus 5%, the results indicate that driver expectations increase in the middle and lower age groups. One possible result of these higher expectations is an increase in the number and size of liability actions against all levels of government. Vehicle corrosion costs are on the decline and have been substantially overstated. Structural deterioraton remains the highest substantiated indirect cost of winter maintenance salting programs.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 151-158
  • Monograph Title: SNOW REMOVAL AND ICE CONTROL RESEARCH
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00193873
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Jun 13 1979 12:00AM