PHASE COMPOSITION MEASUREMENTS ON SOILS AT VERY HIGH WATER CONTENTS BY THE PULSED NUCLEAR MAGNETIC RESONANCE TECHNIQUE

A simple, rapid method of determining the unfrozen water content of frozen soils is described in detail. The method uses the first pulse amplitude of a pulsed nuclear magnetic resonance analyzer. Phase composition curves were obtained for four soils at very high total water contents. Three of the soils (Manchester fine sand, Fairbanks silt, and Goodrich clay) had been previously examined by another method (isothermal calorimeter). The fourth (Kotzebue silt) is a naturally saline soil found in low-lying coastal regions of Alaska. This soil was tested both in its natural state and with the soluble salts removed. The phase composition curves obtained by the nuclear magnetic resonance method are consistent with those obtained by using the isothermal calorimeter, but the nuclear magnetic resonance method saved time, requiring only 48 h. It also provides a high degree of reproducibility and can be used over a wide range of temperatures. As expected, the unfrozen water content of the saline soil was much higher in its natural state than after removal of the soluble salts. In addition, the unfrozen water content of all four soils appears to increases somewhat as the total water content of the sample is increased. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 11-14
  • Monograph Title: Moisture and frost-related soil properties
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00193794
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: May 11 1979 12:00AM