EFFECTS OF TECHNOLOGICAL IMPROVEMENTS IN LOADING AND UNLOADING CONTAINERS AND SHIPBORNE BARGES ON DESIGN OF EQUIPMENT AND INLAND PORTS. ABRIDGMENT

The basic premise of this paper is that progress in vessel design and transshipment has rendered obsolete the port facilities of 10 to 15 years ago. This progress has required new design criteria for coastal ports, inland ports, and waterways. To accommodate the increased size of barge-carrying ships, it is recommended that conventional channel depth of ports 11.3 to 12 m (37 to 40 ft) be increased to 16.8 m (55 ft.) Inland waterways should also be increased from 45.7 to 61m (150 to 200 ft.), the length increased from 366 to 457m (1300 to 1500 ft.), and depths over the sill increased from 15.2 to 18.3m (50 to 60 ft.). Barge locks should be designed for 33.5 (110 ft.) widths, 366m (1200 ft) lengths, and 4.9m (16 ft) depths over the sill. General cargo breakbulk wharves of coastal ports must be designed longer, wider, and with deeper water alongside to service larger ships, and their roll-on and roll-off facilities should be designed according similar criteria. In addition to increased size of barge-carrying ships, dry bulk vessels, oil tankers, and oil-bulk-ore carriers have also increased in size. Thus, coastal port terminals that handle bulk materials require areas for cargo consolidation and require high transfer rates to ensure a rapid vessel turnaround.

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Pagination: pp 10-12
  • Monograph Title: Waterborne commerce and inland port development
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00193350
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Apr 25 1979 12:00AM