STRESS IN AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLERS: A RESTUDY OF 32 CONTROLLERS 5 TO 9 YEARS LATER

Thirty-two subjects who had participated in air traffic controller stress studies 5-9 years earlier were restudied with regard to urinary excretion of 17-ketogenic steroids, epinephrine, and norepinephrine. All subjects showed decreases in excretion of 17-ketogenic steroids. Eight of the subjects had taken noncontroller jobs; these subjects showed work-related increases in epinephrine excretion whereas the 24 controllers who remained active in controlling aircraft showed work-related decreases in epinephrine excretion. There were no significant findings related to norepinephrine excretion. It is concluded that the active controller group shows evidence of reduced chronic stress. Various interpretations of this finding include less stress at their new facilities, greater experience in their jobs, improvements in the entire traffic control system, and the effects of normal aging. (Author)

Media Info

  • Pagination: 11 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00192202
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FAA-AM-78-40
  • Files: NTIS, USDOT
  • Created Date: Jul 11 2002 12:00AM