THE EFFECT OF MOTORCYCLE HELMETS ON HEARING AND THE DETECTION OF WARNING SIGNALS

Measurements of the at-ear helmet-generated aerodynamic noise and helmet transmission loss were carried out for the two major types of motorcycle helmets. From this data and existing information on noise generation by flow around a bare head it was found that for quiet motorcycles at typical speeds the majority of the riders at-ear noise is generated by the air flow. An assessment of the possibility of hearing damage was then carried out. It was found that only with extremely high usage would there be a significant risk of hearing damage for either the bare-headed or helmeted rider. Helmets did, however, give significant protection. Detection of warning signals was then considered. It was found that under no conditions did the helmet put its wearer at a disadvantage to the bare-headed rider and at typical speeds the helmet gives a considerable advantage in the detection of warning signals. /Author/SRIS/

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Utah, Salt Lake City

    Department of Mechanical and Industrial Engineering
    Salt Lake City, UT  USA  84112
  • Authors:
    • Van Moorhem, W K
    • SHEPHERD, K P
    • Magleby, T D
    • Torian, G E
  • Publication Date: 1977

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 26 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00190132
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Report/Paper Numbers: UTEC 77-010
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 26 1979 12:00AM