Factors Affecting the Likelihood of Reporting Road Crashes Resulting in Medical Treatment to the Police

All road crash casualties in Hong Kong should have matching police crash records. However, the lack of supplementary data sources means that it is often not possible to determine the percentage of road crashes resulting in injuries requiring hospital medical care that are reported to the police, let alone the factors associated with reporting such crashes to police. This study examines the percentage of road crashes resulting in injuries requiring hospital care that are reported to the police and identifies factors associated with reporting such crashes. The data of one of two hospitals in the Road Casualty Information System were matched with the police’s Traffic Accident Database System. Demographic, road user and injury severity factors were analyzed to identify those associated with reporting injury-related road crashes. Descriptive statistics are used to summarize the percentage of road-crash casualties that matched, did not match or partially matched the police casualty database. Cross tabulations were then presented to compare the relationships based on different medically treated groups. A logistic regression model was used to examine the impact of various selected factors on reporting rates. Results showed that the police-reporting rate was estimated to be 57.5–59.9%. Under-reporting among children (reporting rate = 33.6%) and cyclists (reporting rate = 33.0%) was particularly serious. These results indicate that the police crash database needs to be supplemented by other data and that any estimation of the social costs of road crashes must recognize the under-reporting problem.

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01054761
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 31 2007 2:45PM