Perceptual and Motor Strategies of Car Drivers in Regulating Speed of Approach to a Preceding Vehicle

This article is from a special issue that includes contributions dealing with human factors within a large research action (ARCOS: Research Action on Safe Driving). The ARCOS main objective was the exploration of the meeting between driver needs and technical devices capable of maintaining the vehicle trajectory within a safe envelope. In this article, the authors report on a study undertaken to identify the perceptual and motor strategies used by car drivers to prospectively regulate the speed of approach to a preceding vehicle so as to avoid collision. The study included two groups: the first group of 13 participants had less than 3 years of driving experience (mean age, 20.5 years); the second group of 13 participants had more than 5 years of driving experience (mean age, 26.5 years). The study used a simulator under 16 different experimental conditions. Situations ranged from no danger (preceding vehicle at the same speed) to imminent danger (stationary obstacle). Overall, the results for less-experienced and experienced drivers showed similar behavioral patterns, avoiding collision and adapting to the situation presented, with more change intervening more rapidly for the more urgent situations. The analyses of the duration of braking activity revealed that braking itself seems to depend on a complex relation between inter-vehicle distance and relative speed.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Special Issue: Car-Driving Assistance for Safety.
  • Authors:
    • Meskali, M
    • Barbet, I
    • Espie, S
    • Bootsma, R J
  • Publication Date: 2006-4

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: pp 183-207
  • Serial:
    • Travail Humain
    • Volume: 69
    • Issue Number: 2
    • Publisher: Presses Universitaires de France

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01054684
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 30 2007 8:36PM