A REALISTIC ASSESSMENT OF MASS TRANSIT SYSTEMS IN A LOW DENSITY REGION: THE CASE OF SAN DIEGO

This article outlines several major reasons why a fixed-route system of mass transit in a low density region is not a viable mode of transportation for the vast majority of residents. After establishing the problems associated with such a system, attention is focused upon a proposal to implement a fixed-guideway system in the San Diego region. It is demonstrated by reference to a Mass Transit Survey that San Diego residents by and large do not intend to use the newly proposed system although they would finance its construction. It is concluded that the attitudes of these residents are typical of commuters who live in an exceedingly auto-oriented and decentralized urban setting. The land use configuration is used to illustrate basic problems which confront fixed-route mass transit systems in cities like San Diego. The dynamics of speed and frequency of service in rapid mass transit systems, and the relationship between price and service capability are discussed, and criticism is offered of the transit element of the Comprehensive Plan for San Diego Region. The observation is made that unless a transit system is capable of providing the aveage traveller with the same flexibility and demand-responsive potential as the automobile, it is not hopeful that the transit system will draw a substantial number of riders from the automobile to make the construction and operation of the new system economically feasible.

  • Corporate Authors:

    Joint Center for Transportation Studies

    202 C Street
    San Diego, CA  United States  92101
  • Authors:
    • Clapp, J A
    • Rea, L M
  • Publication Date: 1976-7

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 3-14
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00185391
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transportation Perspectives
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 3 1981 12:00AM