THE EFFECTS OF URBAN STRUCTURE ON AUTOMOBILE OWNERSHIP AND JOURNEY TO WORK MODE CHOICES

This study documents an investigation of the effects on automobile ownership and use of intermetropolitan differences in transit and highway service levels and oveall urban development patterns. Specifically, we present models of the determinants of automobile ownership and mode choice for 163,488 white, single-worker households from the largest 125 standard metropolitan statistical areas in 1970. Indexes of highway capacity, transit service levels, and overall residential density for each area as well as each household's socioeconomic characteristics, work-place location, and residence choice, are used to explain the number of automobiles owned by each household, and, given that, each household's work trip mode (automobile, bus, or rail passenger; or walking). The models offer a framework for considering the effect of alternative urban development scenarios on automobile ownership and use, and for comparing alternative development and infrastructure policy options. Because the models were estimated using households from different areas, they are particularly appropriate for investigation changes in spatial structure. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 9-17
  • Monograph Title: Transportation development and land use planning
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00184710
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0309026873
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Dec 29 1981 12:00AM