SYRACUSE STREET LIGHTING: DEFENSIVE DECISION-MAKING BY A CITY FACED WITH ESCALATING ENERGY COSTS

As an urbanized public function, municipal street lighting is a $420 million yearly industry. Installation of energy-efficient lamps (e.g., high-pressure sodium) may result in a 60% decrease in energy required by earlier technologies, but utilities (the owners of most street lighting systems) are slow to convert. Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation owns and operates the system in Syracuse, New York. Rates had been low until 1973. But by 1974, Niagara Mohawk estimated it needed a 42% increase in street-lighting rates. With an increase of $300,000 in 1975, city officials began tentatively to consider options, the main one being to purchase the system. Options to buy street lighting systems in neighboring cities had been defeated by popular vote. Some calculations showed that by acquiring the system, a net loss of income to the city of Syracuse would result. A program to install the HPS lamps was implemented, but to date only 241 lamps have been installed. The technical innovation was more involved than was anticipated. (ERA citation 03:040919)

  • Corporate Authors:

    Syracuse University Research Corporation

    P.O. Box 26, University Station
    Syracuse, NY  USA  13210

    Department of Energy

    1000 Independence Avenue, SW
    Washington, DC  USA  20585
  • Authors:
    • Roberts, D D
  • Publication Date: 1977-12

Media Info

  • Pagination: 25 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00186027
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: COO-4044-2D
  • Contract Numbers: EY-76-C-02-4044
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 29 1979 12:00AM