CALIFORNIA'S CENTER OF POPULATION MONUMENT : WHERE ARE ALL THE PEOPLE AND WHY ARE THEY MOVING?

The mean center of population (COP) for the United States, which was found in the 2000 census to be Phelps County, Missouri, can be used, according to this article, for a variety of cartographical purposes. This article specifically addresses California’s role in “pulling” the COP further and further west as the state’s population continues to grow out of synch with the rest of the country. The COP is, by definition, the imaginary balance point used to analyze population distribution and change. In essence, it is the single point that is closest to all the people living in the state. In establishing such a geographical point, there are a number of logistical issues that surveyors must take into account. In California, one such issue is that of tectonic forces. As the earth’s crust can move as much as 5 centimeter per year, the GPS tracking of geodetic changes has proved invaluable. The article closes with some speculation on the implications and causation upon the COP from transportation. Since California is key to the center of the population, the article speculates that American’s increased mobility through transportation technologies catalyzes the continual shift west in COP

  • Corporate Authors:

    California Department of Transportation

    1120 N Street
    Sacramento, CA  United States  95814
  • Authors:
    • Turner, M S
  • Publication Date: 2005

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos;
  • Pagination: pp 2-6
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01005597
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: UC Berkeley Transportation Library
  • Files: BTRIS, TRIS, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Oct 19 2005 2:04PM