ENGINEERED SCULPTURE : WITH A COMPLEX GEOMETRY, SUNDIAL PEDESTRIAN BRIDGE CASTS A TIMELY SHADOW

This article describes the construction procedure of the Sundial Bridge, located in Turtle Bay Exploration Park in Redding, California. This pedestrian bridge, which was designed by Santiago Calatrava, turned out to be a highly complex engineering project, as the elegant and artistic design did not prove to be conventional or inexpensive. The bridge is stayed by a single inclined pylon located on one side of the Sacramento River without any support located in the river itself (as this would interrupt the local salmon-spawning habitat). Although originally designed by Calatrava to be constructed parallel to the river then swung on axis in to place, the actual erection took place in a more conventional fashion with the pylon constructed first with the truss being cantilevered over the pylon and then attaching the cable stays. Despite numerous difficulties in the fabrication design (as each piece of the pylon would be differently shaped and welded accordingly), the logistical planning of getting the fabricated steel from the manufacturing site in Vancouver, Washington to the bridge location in Redding, and the $25 million cost being $10 million over-budget, the bridge has turned out to be a conceptual triumph. Although contractors found these difficulties challenging, the final product proved to be not only functional by connecting both sides of the park, but also aesthetically successful.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Scranton Gillette Communications

    380 E Northwest Highway, Suite 200
    Des Planes, IL  United States  60016-2282
  • Authors:
    • Zeyher, A
  • Publication Date: 2005-8

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01005514
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: UC Berkeley Transportation Library
  • Files: BTRIS, TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 19 2005 1:57PM