LEAD, ESPECIALLY EXHAUST LEAD, IN THE TERRESTRIAL ENVIRONMENT: ACCUMULATION AND ECOLOGICAL EFFECTS. A LITERATURE SURVEY

BLY, SAERSKILT AVGASBLY, I DEN TERRESTRA MILJOEN - UPPLAGRING OCH EKOLOGISKA EFFEKTER. IITTERATUROEVERSIKT

Global emission of motor exhaust lead is 1/4 million metric tons/yr. The largest particles settle close to the road, but the smallest ones form aerosols. Most of the lead deposited on vegetation is prevented by the cuticle from entering the tissues. The concentration of lead along highways can amount to up to 30 times the background level to which it rapidly falls, however, within 15-150 M. In the soil, lead is bound to phosphates, clay or humus complexes. The degree of leaching and biological availability is therefore limited but may increase with long-term changes in soil conditions such as a decrease in ph. The root is capable of restricting the uptake of lead and its transport to the shoot. The literature on the effects of exhaust lead on vegetation and on the microbiological decomposition of organic matter is still scanty. Small mammals, insects, spiders and especially earthworms living at the roadside accumulate lead. The normal human intake is around 300 microgram per day, 10% of which is absorbed. Most food contains less than 1 ppm dry weight of lead. In rural areas 20-30% of all lead absorbed comes from the air but in cities often more than 50%. /TRRL/

  • Corporate Authors:

    National Swedish Environmental Protection Board

    Smedesvagen 5, Fack
    S-171 20 Solna,   Sweden 
  • Authors:
    • FOLKESON, L
  • Publication Date: 1976

Language

  • Swedish

Media Info

  • Features: References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 103 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00182771
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Transport and Road Research Laboratory (TRRL)
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Monograph
  • Files: ITRD, TRIS
  • Created Date: Nov 14 1978 12:00AM