Intersection and Driveway Studies

This chapter describes how intersection and driveway studies are among the most common studies in transportation engineering. In particular, many agencies routinely count turning movements and study intersection delays. Other intersection and driveway studies include queue length, saturation flow and lost time, gap and gap acceptance, and intersection sight distance studies. Engineers perform these studies less often but find them use for special locations or when calibrating basic relationships. Engineers use the results of intersection and driveway studies to determine whether signals are warranted and to determine intersection capacity, traffic signal timing, site development impacts, safe speeds, and other important parameters. The chapter explains how the basic data needs from intersection and driveway studies have changed very little through the years. However, the equipment used to conduct the studies has changed greatly in recent years and it is likely to keep changing in the future. In the chapter, the basic procedure for each study is described together with the equipment that is most commonly used by agencies in North America for delay, queue length, saturation flow and lost time, gap and gap acceptance, and intersection sight distance studies. Following the presentation of a study’s basic procedure, other equipment and methods are described.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • This book was reprinted in 2000 by the Institute of Transportation Engineers.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Institute of Transportation Engineers (ITE)

    Washington, DC  United States 
  • Authors:
    • Hummer, Joseph E
  • Publication Date: 1994

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: `pp 69-87
  • Monograph Title: MANUAL OF TRANSPORTATION ENGINEERING STUDIES

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 01002921
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 0130975699
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 11 2005 12:37PM