FATAL RED LIGHT CRASHES: THE ROLE OF RACE AND ETHNICITY

This study uses the 1990-1996 Fatality Analysis Reporting System data to examine the role of race/ethnicity on fatal red light running motor vehicle crashes. The goal is to investigate the existence of differences regarding the prevalence of red light running among African Americans, Hispanics, and Whites by identifying some of the underlying factors. The study summarizes that race/ethnicity does play a role in shaping the prevalence of red light running. However, the study suggests that the direct role played by race/ethnicity on red light running may not be as important as its indirect one. Racial/ethnic differences surfaced only among those who did not consume alcohol, do not wear a safety belt, nor have an invalid driver license, or any other deviating behavior. When any of these deviating behaviors were present, the relative importance of these factors obscured the detection of a direct role of race/ethnicity.

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00989590
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Apr 23 2005 12:00AM