REAR SEAT BELT USE AS AN INDICATOR OF SAFE ROAD BEHAVIOUR IN A RAPIDLY DEVELOPING COUNTRY

This study examines the use of seat belts in cars entering a university and hospital campus in Oman to determine the degree of seat belt use in the rear seats. In Oman, wearing a seat belt is compulsory in the front seats but not in the rear. At peak times on a selected day, 1,066 cars were stopped at the university's entrance barrier. The type of driver was identified (student, employee, hospital patient or visitor) and the degree of seat belt use among drivers and passengers was noted. Results showed that 90.1% of drivers and 80.9% of front seat passengers were wearing a restraint compliant with local traffic regulations. However, only 1.4% of rear seat passengers wore a seat belt. Only 3.7% of children under the age of five were restrained in a child safety seat and only 16.7% of children aged 5 to 12 years old were restrained. A third of under-fives were sitting in the front seat. In cars with child occupants, 40% of the time parents wore seat belts but the children did not. These findings suggest that although occupants conformed to the law, their behavior indicated a lack of awareness of the dangers of not wearing seat belts, especially for children. Implications for public health programs are indicated.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    RSH House

    38A St. Georges Drive
    London SW1V 4BH,   England 
  • Authors:
    • McIlvenny, S
    • Al Mahrouql, F
    • Al Busaidi, T
    • Al Nabhani, A
    • Al Hikmani, F
    • Al Kharousi, Z
    • Al Maarrii, S
    • Al Hoti, A
    • Al Shihi, A
    • Al Lawati, A
    • Al Kahrousi, I
  • Publication Date: 2004-11

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00989070
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 11 2005 12:00AM