AUTOGENOUS SHRINKAGE OF HIGH-STRENGTH CONCRETE CONTAINING SILICA FUME UNDER DRYING AT EARLY AGES

In high-strength concrete, autogenous shrinkage is an important component of volume changes resulting in the occurrence of cracks (in addition to cracks caused by drying shrinkage and temperature deformation). This article reports on a study of the autogenous shrinkage of high-strength concrete containing silica fume under drying at early ages. The authors examined the influence of drying on hydration of cementitious materials in the high-strength concrete with water-binder ratios of 0.25, 0.35 and 0.45, which was exposed to drying at the ages of 0.5, 1.0 and 3.0 days, respectively. By establishing the relationship between the bound water content (BWC) and autogenous shrinkage strain under sealed conditions, the authors separated out the autogenous shrinkage strain under drying conditions and drying shrinkage strain from total shrinkage strain. Results showed that the drying initiation age affected BWC after drying. The percentage of autogenous shrinkage was macroscopically 50-20% based on the present method, while determinations of shrinkage based on the conventional superposition principle (SP) would have estimated 70-30% shrinkage (thus overestimating autogenous shrinkage strain under drying conditions). Drying shrinkage became dominant as the water to binder (W/B) ratio increased.

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    Elsevier

    The Boulevard, Langford Lane
    Kidlington, Oxford  United Kingdom  OX5 1GB
  • Authors:
    • Yang, Yang
    • Sato, R
    • Kawai, K
  • Publication Date: 2005-3

Language

  • English

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  • Accession Number: 00989000
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 29 2005 12:00AM