INFLUENCE OF POLYMERS ON MICROSTRUCTURE AND ADHESIVE STRENGTH OF CEMENTITIOUS TILE ADHESIVE MORTARS

Commercially available tile adhesive mortars consist of a binder and mineral fillers, and are usually modified with cellulose ether (CE) and redispersible polymer powder (RP). This article reports on a study in which the impact of polymer modification on the physical properties of cementitious mortars is investigated using a multimethod approach. The authors focus on the identification and quantification of different polymer components within the cementitious matrix. With respect to thin-bed applications, particularly tile adhesives, the spatial distributions of latex, cellulose ether (CE), polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), and cement hydration products can be quantified. The results show that capillary forces and evaporation induce water fluxes in the interconnected part of the pore system, which transport CE, PVA, and cement ions to the mortar interfaces. In contrast, the distribution of latex remains homogeneous. These results allow better understanding of the evolution from fresh to hardened mortar, including polymer film formation, cement hydration, and water migration. The resulting microstructure and the failure modes can be correlated with the final adhesive strength of the tile adhesive. The authors conclude that skinning prior to tile inlaying can strongly reduce wetting properties of the fresh mortar and lower final adhesive strength.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    Elsevier

    The Boulevard, Langford Lane
    Kidlington, Oxford  United Kingdom  OX5 1GB
  • Authors:
    • Jenni, A
    • Holzer, L
    • Zurbriggen, R
    • Herwegh, M
  • Publication Date: 2005-1

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00988981
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Apr 18 2005 12:00AM