LOW FREQUENCY CABIN NOISE REDUCTION BASED ON THE INTRINSIC STRUCTURAL TUNING CONCEPT: THE THEORY AND THE EXPERIMENTAL RESULTS, PHASE 2

Low frequency cabin noise and sonically induced stresses in an aircraft fuselage may be reduced by intrinsic tuning of the various structural members such as the skin, stringers, and frames and then applying damping treatments on these members. The concept is also useful in identifying the key structural resonance mechanisms controlling the fuselage response to broadband random excitation and in developing suitable damping treatments for reducing the structural response in various frequency ranges. The mathematical proof of the concept and the results of some laboratory and field tests on a group of skin-stringer panels are described. In the so-called stiffness-controlled region, the noise transmission may actually be controlled by stiffener resonances, depending upon the relationship between the natural frequencies of the skin bay and the stiffeners. Therefore, cabin noise in the stiffness-controlled region may be effectively reduced by applying damping treatments on the stiffeners.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Subm-Sponsored in Part by NASA.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Boeing Commercial Airplane Company

    P.O. Box 3707
    Seattle, WA  United States  98124
  • Authors:
    • SenGupta, G
  • Publication Date: 1978-3

Media Info

  • Pagination: 104 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00181679
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NASA-CR-145262
  • Contract Numbers: F33657-72-C-0829
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Oct 31 1979 12:00AM