EXPLORATION OF THE RELATIONSHIPS BETWEEN OPERATING SPEED AND ROADWAY FEATURES ON TANGENT SECTIONS

The transportation profession is seeking to better understand the features that influence roadway speeds. Engineers need an appreciation of which roadway design features, or the values for the features, clearly relate to the speed performance on a facility. This study utilized free-flow speed data collected at 79 tangent sites in suburban/urban and rural areas in seven cities located in six states. Key variables used to select sites included functional classification (arterial, collector, and local), edge treatment (curb and gutter versus shoulder), and speed limit. Technicians collected speed data at the midpoint of long straight sections during daylight conditions. For each site, roadway and roadside characteristics were collected such as number of access points within the study section, roadside development type, lane width, and others. Statistical testing revealed that posted speed limit was the only statistically significant variable at a 5% alpha level. Access density was next with an approximate 20% alpha level. Several variables other than posted speed limit and access density showed signs of influence on the 85th percentile free-flow operating speed, including: median type, parking along the street, and pedestrian activity level. A followup cluster analysis revealed the following noteworthy features: pedestrian activity, parking, centerline, median treatment, roadside development, area type, and signal density.

Language

  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00987557
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Mar 28 2005 12:00AM