POTENTIAL APPLICATIONS OF PAVING FABRICS TO REDUCE REFLECTIVE CRACKING

Asphalt concrete overlay on the existing pavement is often used as a cost-saving surface treatment for deteriorating pavements. A major problem encountered with asphalt resurfacing is the phenomenon termed reflective cracking, the propagation of existing cracks from old or existing pavement into the new overlay. Reflective cracking is one of the most significant factors in pavement deterioration. It is caused by shear and tensile stresses in the asphalt layer induced by traffic loads, change in temperature, expansive subgrade soils, moisture changes, existing cracks, and joint and crack movements in the underlying pavement. In this project, the available literature on the applications and effectiveness of stress-relieving interlayers, known as paving fabrics, to reduce reflective cracking is synthesized. Basic functions of paving fabrics, fabric specifications, mechanism, long-term performance, life cycles and cost effectiveness, factors influencing performance, recent innovations, and lessons learned from installation are discussed. In addition, a survey of the current paving fabric applications in the State of Mississippi was conducted to determine the various practices and performances of the paving fabric systems to reduce reflective cracking. The field performance of overlays using fabric interlayers has generally been successful, although there have been cases where the paving fabric systems provided little or no improvements. In particular, paving fabrics may not reduce cracking significantly with thin overlays. A summary of current practices as well as possible directions for future research is reported.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 45 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00987785
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: FHWA/MS-DOT-RD-05-174,, Final Report
  • Contract Numbers: State Study 174
  • Files: NTL, TRIS, ATRI, USDOT, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Mar 30 2005 12:00AM