FOR HEAVEN'S SAKE FOLLOW THE RULES: PEDESTRIANS' BEHAVIOR IN AN ULTRA-ORTHODOX AND A NON-ORTHODOX CITY

This study investigates the behavioral differences between religious and non-religious pedestrians. A sample of 1,047 pedestrians were observed at two busy urban intersections in neighboring cities in Israel. The observations were conducted in three separate intervals in Ramat-Gan, a typical secular city, and Bnei-Brak, an ultra-orthodox city, during the afternoon hours. Five activities were the focus of the observation: running a red light, crossing where there is no crosswalk, walking along the road, failing to check for traffic prior to crossing, and taking a child's hand when crossing. A Chi square test for independence was used to estimate the effect of location, gender and age. In the case of two-by-two cross-tabulation, the nondirectional measure of association for categorical variables was calculated. Findings indicate that males committed significantly more violations than females. There is a negative correlation between age and frequency of violations--the younger the individual, the more frequently she or he committed a violation. Beyond age and gender as behavioral determinants, pedestrians in the orthodox environment committed violations about three times more frequently than those in the secular environment. Part of the significant difference found between the secular and the ultra-orthodox pedestrians may be due to the fact that age was related to the violation rate in Ramat-Gan, but not in Bnei-Brak.

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  • English

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Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00986620
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 8 2005 12:00AM