EFFECT OF FINISHING PRACTICES ON PERFORMANCE OF CONCRETE CONTAINING SLAG AND FLY ASH AS MEASURED BY ASTM C 672 RESISTANCE TO DEICER SCALING TESTS

This article reports on a study undertaken to assess whether the apparent poor performance of concretes containing supplementary cementing materials (in ASTM C 672, Test Method for Scaling Resistance of Concrete Surfaces Exposes to Deicing Chemicals) can be attributed to differences in finishing effort and/or timing of finishing. The authors developed a test method to evaluate Portland cement systems with different air contents. Three mixes were prepared with the same nominal 28-day strength and air content, and similar aggregate and cementitious materials content. One concrete mixture contained Type I Portland cement, the second concrete mixture contained ground granulated blast furnace slag at 50% cement replacement, and the third concrete mixture had fly ash at 25% cement replacement. Nine slabs were cast from each mix; all of the slabs were tested for 50 cycles after the slabs had been cured for 14 days moist and then 14 days laboratory air. In general, results showed that late finishing was beneficial in the OPC mixes, while early finishing appears to be beneficial in the mixes containing fly ash and slag. Parameters that appear to be significant include: time of finishing, relative to the amount, rate and period of bleeding; time of finishing relative to loss of workability (slump); and rate of strength gain of the mixture at the age at which tests are conducted.

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  • Corporate Authors:

    ASTM International

    100 Barr Harbor Drive
    West Conshohocken, PA  United States  19428-2959
  • Authors:
    • Taylor, P C
    • Morrison, W
    • Jennings, V A
  • Publication Date: 2003-12

Language

  • English

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  • Accession Number: 00986568
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 22 2005 12:00AM