DRIVING AND SIDE TASK PERFORMANCE: THE EFFECTS OF DISPLAY CLUTTER, SEPARATION, AND MODALITY

In-vehicle technologies (IVT), such as telematics, entertainment devices, and cell phones, create additional tasks for the driver, possibly also creating safety concerns. This article reports on a study undertaken to examine the effects of display clutter from overlay, display separation, and modality on driving and IVT task performance. Using a fixed-base simulator, the study had 22 drivers driving different routes and responding to infrequent, unexpected road hazards while engaging in a phone number task. The study used visual displays (on a head-up) or head-down display (HDD), or digits were presented auditorily. The results showed no general differences in performance for the adjacent and overlay displays; however, there were costs associated with the HDD and auditory display for some measures (in particular, responses to hazard events were slowed when drivers used the HDD). The authors conclude with a brief discussion of the implications of this research for the placing of displays in the vehicle.

  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • This issue of Human Factors is dated Winter 2004
  • Corporate Authors:

    Human Factors and Ergonomics Society

    P.O. Box 1369
    Santa Monica, CA  United States  90406-1369
  • Authors:
    • Horrey, W J
    • Wickens, C D
  • Publication Date: 2004

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 611-624
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00986521
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Feb 14 2005 12:00AM