USE OF BUILDING RUBBLES AS RECYCLED AGGREGATES

This article reports on a study of recycled aggregates made from building rubble, containing waste concrete, bricks, and tiles. The authors conducted a series of tests to investigate the effects of recycled aggregates on the mechanical properties of the resulting concrete. The results show that the building rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate through proper processing. Using unwashed recycled aggregate in concrete affect its strength, notably flexural strength. This effect is more obvious at lower water/cement ratios. When the recycled aggregate was washed, these negative effects were greatly alleviated. The recycled coarse aggregate is the weakest phase at a low water/cement ratio. The authors conclude that building rubble could be transformed into useful recycled aggregate through proper processing. The modulus of elasticity for recycled concrete was only about 70% that of normal concrete. The quantity of recycled fine aggregate in the mortar is more effective than the water/cement ratio in governing the percentage reduction in strength for recycled mortar. This is different than the behavior seen with coarse aggregate. At higher water/cement ratios (lower strength of mortar), the compressive strength of recycled concrete is similar to that of normal concrete.

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    Elsevier

    The Boulevard, Langford Lane
    Kidlington, Oxford  United Kingdom  OX5 1GB
  • Authors:
    • Chen, H-J
    • Yen, T
    • Chen, K-H
  • Publication Date: 2003-1

Language

  • English

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  • Accession Number: 00986467
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Feb 8 2005 12:00AM