A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF RESULTS FROM THREE RECENT NON-SEPARATED CONCURRENT-FLOW HIGH OCCUPANCY FREEWAY LANE PROJECTS: BOSTON, SANTA MONICA AND MIAMI

Results from three recent non-separated concurrent-flow high occupancy freeway lane projects, Boston's Southeast Expressway, the Santa Monica Freeway in Los Angeles, and Miami's I-95, are compared. The Los Angeles and Miami projects have been terminated, and, in Miami, the carpool definition has been decreased to two or more persons per car. While carpooling and bus ridership increased, other results point out the many generic weaknesses in the concept: the large number of violators and the difficulty of enforcement; the potential for accidents; the inability of the reserved lanes by themselves to attract large numbers of new bus riders and carpooles; and the political problems associated with removing an already existing lane from general use. A comparison of the performance of these non-separated reserved lane projects with the Shirely Highway reversible lanes and the El Monte busway indicates that when concurrent flow lanes are separated from the general lanes by a concrete barrier or an empty safety lane, the accident and enforcement problems are virtually eliminated and the reserved lanes are better able to perform their function of attracting and carrying high occupancy vehicles. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 17-25
  • Monograph Title: Recent developments in bus transportation
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00178754
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 030902692X
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: Aug 19 1978 12:00AM