LIGHT SCATTERING TECHNIQUE FOR DISCRIMINATING BETWEEN OIL AND PARTICULATES IN CONTAMINATED WATER

Light scattering techniques are used in several oil-in-water monitors, proposed or in existence. Particulate matter which may interfere with these monitors is also frequently found in oily wastes. An analysis is made of the potential of using measurements of the angular distribution intensity of scattered light in conjunction with a determination of the scattered light polarization for discriminating between oil and particulates. The size conditions which applied to the oil droplets and particulates relative to the incident light allow the scattered light angular intensity distribution to be treated as a consequence of a combination of classical diffraction and geometrical refraction and reflection. The state of polarization of the scattered light for oil droplets is investigated using expressions of the Mie theory. For the particulate matter, the state of polarization is probed on the basis of light reflected from a plane. It would be difficult to discriminate between oil and particulates using measurements of the angular intensity distribution of scattered light even in conjunction with the determination of the state of polarization of the scattered light in a real life situation.

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 153-156

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00178133
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Pollution Abstracts
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Publication 4284
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jul 19 1978 12:00AM