HACKENSACK ESTUARY OIL SPILL: CUTTING OIL-SOAKED MARSH GRASSES AS AN INNOVATIVE DAMAGE CONTROL TECHNIQUE

In May 1976, a 2,000,000-gal oil spill, originating at a riverside tank farm, struck the Hackensack River estuary. Booms failed and the oil moved upriver, coating shores, marshes, creck banks, bulkheads, marinas, and the Sawmill Creek Wildlife Management Area. Hydrology research in velocity and water distribution patterns provided forecasts of slick movement. Search for corrective measures and the advice of a network of scientists led to implementation of an innovative grass-cutting technology. Analysis from the current 5-mo perspective indicates the advisability of a quickly implemented cutting operation where tidal flushing is poor, and the high potential for natural cleansing where oil has reached low-lying, well-washed marsh areas.

Media Info

  • Features: References;
  • Pagination: p. 243-246

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00177071
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: Pollution Abstracts
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Publication 4284
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Jun 28 1978 12:00AM