TRI-LEVEL STUDY FO THE CAUSES OF TRAFFIC ACCIDENTS: AN OVERVIEW OF FINAL RESULTS

Final results of a Tri - Level Accident Causation Study are reported, as well as results of special analysis projects investigating the relationship of driver vision, knowledge, and psychological attributes to accident involvement. A total of 2,258 accidents investigated by technicians, and 420 accidents investigated by a multidisciplianry team are reported. Human factors were cited as probable causes in 93% of accidents, compared to 34% for environemtnal factors and 13% for vehiclular factors. Leading human factors included improper lookout, excessive speed, inattention, and improper evasive action. View obstructions and slick roads were leading environmental factors. The most frequently- involved vehicle factors were gross brake failure, in- adequate tread depth, side-to-side brake imbalance, and underinflation. Vision (especially poor dynamic visual acuity) and personality (especially poor personal and social adjustment) were related to accidents. However, knowledge of the driving task was not shown to be related. /Author/

Media Info

  • Pagination: p. 391-403

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00176802
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Contract Numbers: DOT-HS-053-3-609
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 19 1978 12:00AM