WHY IS IT DIFFICULT TO CHANGE REGULATION

This discussion of obstacles to change regulations focuses on factors related to law, morality (problem of vested interests), and the intellectual problem of the desire for order. It is noted that one way to promote progress is to try to pay off vested interest; for example, compensating medallion holders for the fall in medallion price resulting from allowing free entry into taxicab operations in New York. It is a mistake to assume that the regulated firms have benefited long enough to call for deregulation without compensation. If entry leads to the end of publicly operated buses, the only organized interest group associated with the industry will be labor. If change results in loss to some workers, then they could be compensated. The case of subsidized riders is discussed, and it is stressed that the few who are subsidized are supported by the public at large, and it is the public that must be satisified that the few are being treated fairly.

  • Digital Copy:
  • Availability:
  • Supplemental Notes:
    • This paper appeared in Transportation Research Board Special Report No. 181, Urban Transportation Economics. It contains proceedings of Five Workshops on Pricing Alternatives, Economic Regulations, Labor Issues, Marketing, and Government Financing Responsibilities held by Transportation Research Board. Sponsored by Office of the Secretary, Federal Highway Administration, and Urban Mass Transportation Administration of DOT; Environmental Protection Agency; and Federal Energy Administration.
  • Corporate Authors:

    Transportation Research Board

    500 Fifth Street, NW
    Washington, DC  United States  20001
  • Authors:
    • Feldman, Paul
  • Publication Date: 1978

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00176505
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS, TRB, ATRI
  • Created Date: Nov 14 1981 12:00AM