ROAD TEST TO DETERMINE IMPLICATIONS OF PREVENTING THERMAL REFLECTION CRACKING IN ASPHALT OVERLAYS

In predominantly cold climatic regions, thermal cracking of asphalt pavements and its reflection through bituminous resurfacings is a problem of great concern to the pavement engineers. Reflection cracking causes poor riding quality prematurely, reduces the useful life of a resurfacing, requires accelerated maintenance, and results in an uneconomic use of physical and fiscal resources. Over the years, many treatments have been tried to minimize the reflection cracking in bituminous resurfacing. These treatments have exhibited varying degrees of success; however, none has been consistently successful under all conditions. In Ontario, Canada, eight test sections were constructed in 1971 to determine a viable alternative to the predominantly used conventional resurfacing. A special feature of this experimental road is the two test sections in which the existing asphalt surface was pulverized and used with or without additional asphalt binder as a base for the resurfacing. In this paper, the phenomenon of thermal cracking and its mechanisms and manifestations are discussed. The experimental road is described and the performance of its various test sections over the past 5 years is documented. An economic analysis is conducted in which the trade-offs between the initial construction and the future maintenance costs of various treatments are compared to the costs of a conventional resurfacing. This analysis concludes that pulverization of the existing pavement surface and use of that surface as a base for resurfacing is the most viable alternative to a conventional resurfacing. The paper also describes three full-scale contracts, totaling about 50 km (31 miles), in which treatment was recently used in Ontario. /Author/

Media Info

  • Media Type: Print
  • Features: Figures; Maps; Photos; Tables;
  • Pagination: pp 37-44
  • Monograph Title: Design and performance of pavement overlays
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00173944
  • Record Type: Publication
  • ISBN: 030902658X
  • Files: TRIS, TRB
  • Created Date: May 18 1978 12:00AM