IMPACTS OF WORK SCHEDULE CHANGES ON TRAFFIC CONGESTION IN MEDIUM SIZED URBAN AREAS

A test is made of the hypothesis that changes in work schedules can significantly reduce traffic congestion in medium-sized auto-oriented cities. Using an extreme case--a single high-density employer in a residential area--estimates are made of the change in peak trips resulting from three alternative work-schedule changes; impact on the surrounding street system is then evaluated using traffic assignment techniques. Results show that even a maximum-impact policy (4-day work week) would have only a marginal effect on local traffic, reducing regional travel costs by only 0.4%, and costs in the immediate surrounding area by only 2.2%. Of all traffic benefits accrued, over 90% flow to actual participants, primarily through the reduced number of required work-trips. Because of the institutional problems associated with implementing such policies on a large scale, it is concluded that efforts to reduce highway congestion in auto-oriented medium size cities through alternative work schedules may not be cost/effective. /Author/

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • Prepared in part with the financial assistance of DOT.
  • Corporate Authors:

    New York State Department of Transportation

    Planning Division, State Campus, Building 4
    Albany, NY  USA  12232
  • Authors:
    • Tannir, A A
    • Hargen, D T
  • Publication Date: 1977-6

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 29 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00176769
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: Report No. 126
  • Files: TRIS, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Jun 14 1978 12:00AM