THE DEVELOPMENT OF A MODEL FOR PREDICTING PASSENGER ACCEPTANCE OF SHORT-HAUL AIR TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS

Meaningful criteria and methodology for assessing, particularly in the area of ride quality, the potential acceptability to the traveling public of present and future transportation systems were investigated. Ride quality was found to be one of the important variables affecting the decision of users of air transportation, and to be influenced by several environmental factors, especially motion, noise, pressure, temperature, and seating. Models were developed to quantify the relationship of subjective comfort to all of these parameters and then were exercised for a variety of situations. Passenger satisfaction was found to be strongly related to ride quality and was so modeled. A computer program was developed to assess the comfort and satisfaction levels of passengers on aircraft subjected to arbitrary flight profiles over arbitrary terrain. A model was deduced of the manner in which passengers integrate isolated segments of a flight to obtain an overall trip comfort rating. A method was established for assessing the influence of other links (e.g., access, terminal conditions) in the overall passenger trip.

  • Corporate Authors:

    University of Virginia, Charlottesville

    Center for Transportation Studies, P.O. Box 400742
    Charlottesville, VA  USA  22904-4742
  • Authors:
    • KUHLTHAU, A R
    • JACOBSON, I D
  • Publication Date: 1977-9

Media Info

  • Pagination: 59 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00174574
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Technical Information Service
  • Report/Paper Numbers: NASA-CR-145250
  • Contract Numbers: NGR-47-005-181
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Mar 14 1978 12:00AM