BICYCLE AND BICYCLE HELMET USE PATTERNS IN THE UNITED STATES IN 1998

While national estimates of bicycle-related injuries and deaths are readily available, information about the characteristics and use patterns of bicyclists is not regularly monitored. This article describes the results of a national survey of U.S. bicycle riders conducted in 1998. The survey employed a single-stage list-assisted random digit-dial sample design, and collected information about some of the characteristics and bicycle use patterns of a probability sample of over 1,000 U.S. bicyclists. The results provide information about the population of bicyclists, selected characteristics of riders, bicycle use patterns, helmet usage patterns, and the demographic characteristics of rider households. These results are evaluated in conjunction with national injury estimates to calculate bicycle-related injury rates. The survey results suggest that higher injury rates for children and males are, at least in part, related to higher bicycle usage rates. Results are also compared with those of a similar survey conducted in 1991 to evaluate changes in bicycle and helmet use patterns over time. The most notable change since 1991 is the reported increase in helmet ownership and use.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Elsevier Science, Incorporated

    660 White Plains Road
    Tarrytown, NY  United States  10591-5153
  • Authors:
    • Rodgers, G B
  • Publication Date: 2000

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00800624
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: HS-043 162
  • Files: HSL, TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Oct 16 2001 12:00AM