DECISION PROCESSES AND RISK TAKING IN TRAFFIC: DRIVER RESPONSE TO THE ONSET OF YELLOW LIGHT

A field study examined the relationship between the drivers' distance from an intersection (0-100 yard (0-91.4 m)) when the light changed from green to yellow, and the probability that the drivers would proceed through the intersection. The function relating the two variables approximated a normal ogive, but there was additional evidence that drivers took both distance and speed into account in deciding whether to proceed or stop. Among the drivers who were at intermediate distances (40-60 yards (36.6-54.8 m)) when the light changed, the younger males were more likely to proceed and to violate the red light than were other drivers. The latter finding could be attributed to the younger males' faster driving and the related tendency to ignore the consequences of the decision conflict induced by the yellow light. /Author/

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    American Psychological Association

    750 First Street, NE
    Washington, DC  USA  20002-4242
  • Authors:
    • Konecni, V J
    • Ebbesen, E B
    • Konecni, D K
  • Publication Date: 1976-6

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; References;
  • Pagination: p. 359-367
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00148772
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: National Safety Council Safety Research Info Serv
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: May 11 1977 12:00AM