IMPLEMENTATION AND EVALUATION OF TRAFFIC MARKING RECESSES FOR THE APPLICATION OF THERMOPLASTIC PAVEMENT MARKINGS ON MODIFIED OPEN GRADED FRICTION COURSE

Snow plow blade abrasion is the most noticeable mechanism of damage to all types of pavement marking materials, with the worst effect occurring with thermoplastic skip stripes on open graded friction course (OPFC). Unfortunately, the thermoplastic markings are extruded onto the OGFC at a 1/8 inch thickness, which becomes a substantial target for snow plow blade damage during the winter maintenance season. In some cases the scraping action of the snow plow blades shear off the thermoplastic markings of pull out pieces of the OGFC layers, penetrated by the thermoplastic. If thermoplastic markings are applied to a constructed recess in the pavement surface, the snow plow blades would pass over without damaging either the marking and/or the pavement surface. Therefore, this study explored the best means of creating traffic marking recesses on modified OGFC mixes and the cost effectiveness of this method. A trial field installation of this method was carried out with the cooperation of a contractor. Detailed construction specifications were developed and included application methods and equipment, for use by any state highway agency (SHA). The installation consisted of a 1,000 ft tangent section, a 500 ft exit ramp section, and a 500 ft curved section. Three types of recesses and a non recessed control section were constructed within each test section. A new pavement marking product, permanent inlaid tape, used by the Rhode Island Department of Transportation just outside the limits of the three test sections was also incorporated into the present study.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 195 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00803652
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Report/Paper Numbers: URI-CVET-97-2, NETCR 23
  • Contract Numbers: NETC 95-3
  • Files: NTL, TRIS
  • Created Date: Dec 20 2003 12:00AM