TRAVEL IN NEW URBANIST AND TRADITIONAL COMMUNITIES: A CASE STUDY OF DOWNTOWN ORLANDO. VOLUME I: FINAL REPORT AND APPENDIX A

The claim that traditional urban forms reduce the level of automobile dependence, especially for trips to and from work and during the peak travel time, is examined in this research. While it would be ideal to consider New Urbanist communities, it is widely accepted that they have not reached the maturity necessary to allow them to be considered. Thus, this research considers the travel of residents who choose to live in traditional neighborhoods that afford the use of a range of transportation options. Downtown Orlando, including its adjacent neighborhoods, has been chosen as the location of this research because it appears to have the characteristics that encourage non-automobile travel. The downtown is built on a grid street network. Transit service is widely available. Many jobs are available in downtown Orlando. The city of Orlando's policies support a high quality of life in neighborhoods and encourage traditional neighborhood development in existing neighborhoods and the new development within the Naval Training Center Plan and Southeast Sector Plan. Many people who live in downtown Orlando have an income high enough to allow them the full options of transportation services, including automobile ownership. Thus, this research characterizes the travel of medium to high-income residents of the neighborhoods of downtown Orlando. The results of this research will begin to clarify whether the Florida Department of Transportation, as a matter of policy, should support such development, and, if so, what other policies should be in place to make it more effective.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Appendices; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: 144 p.

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00800235
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Contract Numbers: BC-354-15
  • Files: TRIS, STATEDOT
  • Created Date: Oct 18 2000 12:00AM