SEAT PROPERTIES AFFECTING NECK RESPONSES IN REAR CRASHES: A REASON WHY WHIPLASH HAS INCREASED

Claims for whiplash injuries have increased substantially worldwide over the past two decade. The article refers to several previous studies on the debate between yielding and rigid (stiff) seats. The present study introduces a hard and flexible neck on the occupant's torso which allowed an evaluation of head restraint trajectory in rear crashes, and head and neck dynamics with seatback rotation. Three seat types were evaluated: one represented a stiff seat comparable to the stiffest foreign benchmark of European and Asian luxury vehicle, which had k = kN/m stiffness; another seat represented the high retention design of the 1997 W car with a perimeter frame, and a k = 20 kN/m stiffness and a compliant seat suspension that increased the flexibility of the seat trim, foam, and suspension hardware in the seatback; and the third seat was typical of the 1990 C car (Buick Park Avenue) with k = 20 kN/m stiffness provided by seatback. Occupant dynamics were evaluated in 6-35 km/h rear crashes up to head restraint contact. The study addressed both a possible reason why whiplash has increased over the past two decades as seat strength and stiffness have increased.

  • Availability:
  • Corporate Authors:

    Taylor & Francis

    4 Park Square, Milton Park
    Abingdon,   United Kingdom  OX14 4RN
  • Authors:
    • Viano, D C
  • Publication Date: 2003

Language

  • English

Media Info

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00963085
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Files: TRIS
  • Created Date: Sep 28 2003 12:00AM