RESEARCH, POLICY MAKING AND INTERVENTION PROGRAMMING IN INJURY PREVENTION : A CLASSIC CASE OF SUB-OPTIMISATION

An examination is presented of the state of knowledge and research for injury prevention in general, and a narrower look at injury studies in transportation, occupational settings and "other." The author cautions that his observations are based on conditions in Australia, where he is based, and cannot be immediately extrapolated to other settings. He argues that prevention programs likely work better if they are managed by area, but that research information on injury prevention and occurrence would be improved if more sharing were to take place. In post-industrial countries, once cancer and heart disease are accounted for as striking predominantly older segments of the population, injury is the leading killer and a heavy burden on the health care system. Yet for every dollar spent on injury research, $5 is spent on heart research and $10 is spent on cancer. This is due to there being no single constituency and a cultural tendency to assume the injured person is somehow to blame. Shows the role that various types of injury play in death rates compared to diseases and by injury type. There is only a fledgling science if injury and little theoretical underpinning. Synergies across fields would help improve the situation.

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Figures; Photos; References; Tables;
  • Pagination: p. 58-65
  • Serial:
    • IATSS Research
    • Volume: 27
    • Issue Number: 1
    • Publisher: International Association of Traffic and Safety Sciences
    • ISSN: 0386-1112

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00962256
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: UC Berkeley Transportation Library
  • Files: BTRIS, TRIS, ATRI
  • Created Date: Sep 2 2003 12:00AM