THE ASPHALT RUBBER PHENOMENON : WHEN ASPHALT RUBBER SILENCED ROAD NOISE ON AN ARIZONA FREEWAY, THE PUBLIC DEMAND DEMANDED MORE

Resurfacing a 12-mile stretch of highway between Tempe and Mesa, Arizona, with rubberized asphalt has generated numerous compliments for the quietness of the surface. Drivers like the quiet ride. Residents nearby noticed a drop in road noise. The success has set off a public movement, with Arizona planning to rubberize the 115 miles of concrete freeways in Maricopa County, which surrounds Phoenix, the state capital. The state departments of transportation of Arizona, California, Florida and Texas now specify asphalt rubber for overlays. Rubber is also attractive because of concern about running out of aggregate. Arizona is so pleased with the rubber overlay that it is trying it out as material for new roads. Rubbery overlays also make native aggregates more usable because the rubber reduces the reflexive cracking they are susceptible to acceptable levels. Arizona is monitoring its oldest rubber asphalt roads to see when they crack. Still, many contractors and material suppliers are suspicious of asphalt rubber and state officials are reluctant to try the new material, especially because it comes at a higher initial cost. That limits its use except in situations where noise is an issue or other elements like lack of suitable aggregates would make it advantageous to use.

  • Supplemental Notes:
    • July/August 2003
  • Authors:
    • Fickes, M
  • Publication Date: 2003-7

Language

  • English

Media Info

  • Features: Photos;
  • Pagination: p. 20-23
  • Serial:

Subject/Index Terms

Filing Info

  • Accession Number: 00961154
  • Record Type: Publication
  • Source Agency: UC Berkeley Transportation Library
  • Files: BTRIS, TRIS
  • Created Date: Aug 4 2003 12:00AM